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[?] Szczepanowska

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Szczepanowska, Mme. I Mad. Sczszpanowska, Madm. Schszepanowska l. Not identified. The Office Book recordings of the contributor's name are obviously mistranscriptions of "Szczepanowska." According to the annual reports of the London Literary Association of the Friends of Poland, the number of Polish refugees in England during various years of the 1840S and 1850S ranged from 460 to about 1000. Mme. Szczepanowska was obviously one of these refugees. In her first H.W. contribution ["The Serf of Pobereze", I, 342–50. July 6, 1850] she mentioned having travelled in Poland "last year"; she was apparently in England at the time of contributing the item, as indicated by the Office Book notation that cash was "handed over" by Wills;" she was probably in England also at the time of contributing her second item, which was paid for by post-office order. Her name does not appear in reference works on Polish writers.

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Talfourd, Sir Thomas Noon I Mr. Justice Talfourd, Justice Talfourd l, 1795–1854, judge, author. Attended a dissenters' school, then Reading grammar school. Admitted at Middle Temple, 1813; called to the bar, 1821; serjeant-at-law, 1833; judge of the Common Pleas, 1849; knighted 1849. Three times returned M.P. for Reading; introduced Custody of Infants Bill and Copyright Bill. Universally respected for his high moral character, his integrity. Died suddenly on the Bench while delivering to jury a charge in which he deplored the lack of understanding and sympathy between the rich and the poor. Contributed to Pamphleteer, Monthly Repository, New Monthly, Retrospective Review, London Magazine, Edin. Rev., and other periodicals, including professional journals. Author of Poems on Various Subjects, 1811; Ion, a classical tragedy famous in its day, produced by Macready in 1836; and other plays: The Athenian Captive, Glencoe, The Castilian. As literary executor of his friend Charles Lamb, brought out edition of Lamb's Letters, 1837; also Final Memorials of Lamb, 1848.

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Taylor, Philip Meadows I Mr. Meadows Taylor l, 1808–1876, officer and administrator in India, novelist. Born in Liverpool. Received a few years' schooling – "no education so to speak" (Story of My Life, chap. xviii]. In 1824 sent to Bombay [Mumbai] to enter employ of mercantile house. In same year obtained service with Nizam of Hyderabad; as military officer and civil administrator, remained in service of Nizams for more than thirty years. Administered state of Shorapur during Rajah's minority; had charge of certain ceded districts of the Deccan; kept peace in North Berar during the "Mutiny"; thereafter administrator of Shorapur and Raichur district. Was trusted and loved by native inhabitants of India. C.S.I. 1869. Wrote for Indian periodicals; was The Times correspondent in India, 1841–53; sent occasional contributions to Athenaeum. After his retirement, contributed articles to Edin. Rev. and a novel to Indian Mail. As author of Confessions of a Thug, 1839, and five historical novels, stands as first important English novelist of Indian life. Wrote also letterpress for various volumes of sketches and photographs of Indian scenes, temples, etc.; a history of India, 1870; The Story of My Life, published posthumously.

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[?] Taylor

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Taylor, Mr. Address: Manchester. Not identified. Several hundred Taylors lived in Manchester and its suburbs in the 1850s. The article to which Taylor's name is attached ["A Day in a Pauper Palace", I, 361–64. July 13, 1850] describes an institution for pauper children in Swinton, near Manchester. Editorial comment states that "we solicited a gentleman qualified for the task" to visit the institution and that "we have drawn up the following account" on the basis of his information. The Office Book records the article as "Rewritten almost entirely by W.H.W. & abridged one half."

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James Emerson Tennent

7/4/1804 — 6/3/1869

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Irish politician and friend of Charles Dickens and John Forster. Dickens's last novel, Our Mutual Friend, was dedicated to Tennent.

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Celia Laighton Thaxton

29/6/1835 — 25/8/1894

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American poet and writer.

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William Moy Thomas

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Thomas, WilIiam Moy I Mr. Thomas, Thomas l, 1828–1910, journalist, scholar. Began study for the law, but soon turned his attention to writing; became private secretary to Charles Wentworth Dilke of the Athenaeum. Contributed to Athenaeum, Chambers's, Economist, N. & Q., and other periodicals. London correspondent for New York Round Table; on staff of Daily News; dramatic critic for Graphic and for Academy. First editor of Cassell's, in which his novel A Fight for Life appeared. Edited scholarly edition of William Collins's poems, 1856, and of Lord Wharncliffe's Letters and Works of Mary Wortley Montagu, 1861. Established certain biographical fads concerning Chatterton and Richard Savage. Mentioned by Hatton, Journalistic London (p. 62), as "a writer of rare acumen and large knowledge of books, plays and actors." 

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T M Thomas

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Thomas, T. M. The two items ["A Suburban Connemara", II,  562–65. March 8, 1851; "Margaret Fuller", V, 121–24. April 24, 1852] are the only items that the Office Book assigns to a "Thomas" with the name accompanied by initials. "A Suburban Connemara" is the third item assigned to a Thomas; payment is recorded as "Handed by W.H.W." "Margaret Fuller" is the eleventh item assigned to a Thomas; payment is recorded as "Advanced by W.H.W." The same payment notations appear for various of the items proved by reprinting to be by William Moy Thomas (see separate entry). Both items deal with subjects in which William Moy Thomas had an interest. "A Suburban Connemara" describes a squalid district of London; William Moy Thomas's "Milton's Golden Lane" does the same. "Margaret Fuller" discusses the American writer; William Moy Thomas, though he confessed that he had little acquaintance with American literature, did write an article on Poe (Pictures in a Mirror). The initials "T.M." seem to be a mis-recording for "W.M."
      The article "Margaret Fuller" motivated Landor's poem "On the Death of M. D'Ossoli and His Wife Margaret Fuller," Examiner, May 8, I852. 

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971

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[?] Thompson

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Thompson. Not identified. The contributor suggests that railway clerks, poorly paid as they are, should unite to establish a fund to provide them with assistance in time of sickness or disability. The £1.1.0 payment for the 1-column item is twice the standard rate of payment.
      Some sixty writers named Thompson flourished at the time. 

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971

Articles: 137 · Attachments: 0 · Links: 0 · Hits: 1888

Thombury, George WaIter I Thornbury, W. Thornbury l, 1828–1876, misc, writer. Privately educated. Studied to become artist, then turned his attention to writing. His first articles appeared in Bristol Journal, 1845. Became art critic for Athenaeum. For thirty years was industrious contributor of prose and verse to periodicals – Ainsworth's, Bentley's Misc., Welcome Guest, Once a Week, Art Joumal, Chambers's, and many others. Published some twenty-five books, several of them being collections of his periodical contributions. They include works on social history of England, a life of the artist Turner, sketches of travel and life in foreign countries; also some novels, translations, and volumes of verse. Gained some contemporary reputation as poet.

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[?] Tiffin

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Tiffin. Not identified. Payment for the contribution made by post-office order.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971

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Mary Jane Tomkins

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Tomkins, Mary Jane I Miss Tomkins I. The Office Book notation accompanying payment record for "The Mother's Test" [II, 612. March 22, 1851] reads: "Enclosed & left in Russell Place." The Tomkins residing in Russell Place in the 1850s was John Newton Tomkins (1812–1876), resident surgeon at the National Vaccine Establishment, 8 RusseIl Place. (Address correctly given as Russell Place, Plarr's Lives, I, xxiii; incorrectly given as RusselI Square, II, 423.) Tomkins's work was the examination of specimens of vaccine to be sent to various vaccination stations throughout the country. "In these examinations he was assisted by a favourite sister" – Mary Jane. Mary Jane Tomkins "had some reputation as a writer of poems." She became the wife of Dr. Gustavus Plarr [d. 1892], an Alsatian; she and her husband lived some time on the Continent; when their house was burned down during the Franco-Prussian War [1870–71], they removed to Scotland. They were the parents of Victor Gustave Plarr [1863–1929], librarian to the Royal College of Surgeons of England (Plarr's Lives, II, 422–23; I, vii).
    

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[?] Townsend

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Townsend. Not identified. The contributor is obviously an Englishman who has spent some time in Germany. He states that he found "Amy, the Child" [VIII, 431–32. Dec. 31, 1853] in "an old German pocket-book"; that he was well acquainted with the German university student Max of whom he tells in "Max and His Companions" [XVII, 44–48. Dec. 26, 1857] and that the incident that he related is true. No payment recorded for either contribution. The first reprinted in Harper's, without acknowledgement to H.W.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971

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E Townsend

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Townsend, E. I E. Townsend, Townsend I. Not identified. The third item ["Indian Recruits and Indian English", XVI, 319–22. Oct. 3, 1857] is not a joint writing of the two contributors whose names are attached to it [Townsend and A. H. A. Hamilton]; it consists of two separate sections (unrelated except by the fact that both are motivated by the Indian "Mutiny"), placed under the joint heading obviously by the editorial office. The first section – the longer – has no subtitle; the second has the subtitle "Indian English." The order of names attached to the item indicates that the first section is by Townsend, the second by Hamilton. The payment allotment – two guineas to Townsend, one guinea to Hamilton – confirms this ascription.

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Townshend, Chauncy Hare I Townshend, The Revd. C. H. Townshend I, 1798–1868, poet. Student at Eton. B.A. Cambridge, 1821; M.A. 1824. Took holy orders but was not long active in the ministry. Had means and could devote himself to various aesthetic pursuits; Was amateur painter, musician; collected pictures, coins, gems. Became interested in clairvoyance and mesmerism. Spent much time in travel; passed greater part of his later years at his villa in Lausanne. Contributed to Knight's Quarterly Magazine, Blackwood's. Author of A Descriptive Tour in Scotland, 1840; Sermons in Sonnets, 1851, and other volumes of poems: two books on mesmerism.

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Sophy Traddles

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"Sophy Traddles": See Norris, Miss

Articles: 12 · Attachments: 0 · Links: 0 · Hits: 737
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Theodosia Trollope

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TroIlope, Theodosia (Garrow) I Mrs. Trollope l, 1825–1865, author; first wife of Thomas Adolphus Trollope. Was talented as musician, artist, linguist, verse writer. In her writing, was encouraged by Landor, who expressed extravagant admiration of her verses: through his introduction became contributor in 1839 to Lady Blessington's Book of Beauty; contributed also to Keepsake. Published, 1846, translation of Niccolini's Arnaldo da Brescia, dedicated to Landor, Married in 1848. At Villino, Trollope, a centre of social and literary life in Florence, was a celebrated hostess; to her husband, was "the angel in the house" (What I Remember, p. 515). After her marriage, continued her literary work, both in translation and in original writing. Set some of her verses to music. One of her poems appeared in English Woman's Journal, 1858; a prose contribution in Victoria Regia. Contributed to Athenaeum a series of letters in cause of Italian freedom; reprinted, 1861 as Social Aspects of the Italian Revolution. Contributed to Cornhill articles on three contemporary Italian poets.

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Novelist and periodical writer. Second wife of T. A. Trollope and sister of Ellen Ternan.

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G. Turner

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Turner, G. I G. Turner, followed by what is apparently address: Mr. Grey, Edgeley, Stockport; Turner (overwritten), Adswood I. Directories afford no help in identifying the contributor. He seems most likely to be the journalist Godfrey Wordsworth Turner, 1825–1891. (Allibone, Boase), usually mentioned by his contemporaries as "Godfrey Turner." Godfrey Wordsworth Turner studied art, then turned to journalism. As contributor and staff member was connected with numerous periodicals, e.g., Spectator, Morning Chronicle, Leader, John Bull, Comic Times, Train, Daily News; longest connection was with the Daily Telegraph. Mentioned by Hatton, Journalistic London (p. 138), as writer of "graceful verse and literary sketches." Author of Jest and Earnest, 1861, a medley of prose and verse; two works on paintings, a guide to International Fisheries Exhibition, a handbook titled Picturesque Wales. Was friend of the young H.W. writers Sala, Yates, Hollingshead, the Broughs. Recorded that he met Dickens "at various times in my very young days, when in fact I was but a schoolboy and he a young and successful author"; later saw Dickens in a performance of Not So Bad As We Seem (Kitton, Charles Dickens by Pen and Pencil, pp. 182–83). Wrote "'Boz' and the Play," Theatre, April 1885.
       Another G. Turner – George Gladstone Turner – published, between 1881 and 1887, three volumes of narrative and lyric poems.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971

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