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Franklin Fox

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Fox, Franklin I Mr. Franklyn Fox, Franklyn Fox l, b. ca. 1824, sea captain, writer. Youngest of the three children born to William Johnson Fox (1786–1864) and his wife, Eliza Florance Fox. Remained for the most part with his mother after his father separated from his wife and established ménage in 1835 with Miss Eliza Flower. Was not, however, at odds with his father. Saw him at various times; was with him during the Oldham election of 1840 (Garnett, Life of W. J. Fox, passim). Made his first voyage in 1841 as midshipman aboard an East Indiaman; later shipped on American vessels. Became surveyor to Lloyd's Agency at Karachi and captain in Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation service. In the late 1880s was living at St. Albans, having given up the sea. To People's Journal, Howitt's Journal, and H.W. contributed sketches based on his experiences at sea and in foreign parts. Edited, 1869, a Memoir of his mother. Wrote ChinaChinese Colonisation, the French, the Opium Question, 1884; How to Send a Boy to Sea, 1886; Frank Allreddy's Fortune, 1891, a boys' adventure story. Recorded himself on title page of How to Send a Boy to Sea as author of two additional titles; titles not listed in Brit. Mus. Cat. or in Eng. Cat.

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Miss [?] French

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French, Miss. Not identified. Two of her items are related by a masculine narrator: "Billeted in Boulogne" [XIII, 442–45. May 24,1856] by an Englishman staying with an English family in Boulogne; "Number Five, Hanbury Terrace," [XVI, 568–72. Dec. 12, 1857] by a solicitor's clerk of Irish background who had been a pupil at Christ's Hospital. Dickens found the Boulogne item "weak" (to Wills, April 27, 1856). "Two Difficult Cases: The First Case [lead]" [XIV, 385–91. Nov. 8, 1856] is an account of the trial of Spencer Cowper and three other barristers for the alleged murder, 1699, of the Quakeress Sarah Stout. (The second of "Two Difficult Cases" is by Morley and has no connection with the first case.) Payment for first and third contribution made by cheque.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971 

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Friend of Eliza Lynn Linton. Not identified. Payment for the writer's first two contributions ["The Burthen Lightened", XIV, 301. Oct. 11, 1856; "Word Analogies", XIV, 445. Nov. 22, 1856] made in cash. 

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971. 

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Not identified. The contributor may be the same person as the writer of the papers which Miss Jewsbury sent to Dickens in 1851 and which Dickens found unsuited to the requirements of H.W. (Howe, Geraldine Jewsbury, pp. 95, 207-208). The item listed below recounts the trial of Spencer Cowper and three other barristers for the alleged murder, 1699, of the Quakeress Sarah Stout. (The second of "Two Difficult Cases" is by Morley and has no connection with the first case).

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971.

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Not identified. The contributor seems to be a resident of Paris; may be Sarah Mary Fitton.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971.

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Fusco, Edoardo Nicolà I Fusco l, b. 1824, d. 1872 or 1873, educator. Born in Trani, Apulia, in southern Italy; studied in Naples. Took prominent part in 1848 revolutionary movement in Kingdom of Naples: on its failure, fled to Corfu; lived there for some time; also for some years in Athens and Constantinople. In 1854 went to England; taught Italian and modern Greek in London and at Eton; lectured on Italian literature. His lecture "Italian Art and Literature before Giotto and Dante," delivered at Queen's College, in English, published in Macmillan's, Jan. and July 1876, with prefatory note on Fusco by his friend Matthew Arnold. Knew many prominent families in England. (The copy of his Dell' associazione commerciale artigiana di pietà in Costantinopoli, 1852, in the Brit. Mus, bears Fusco's inscription to Lady Stratford de Redcliffe.) In 1859 or 1860, returned to Italy. There laboured unceasingly in cause of education: became inspector-in-chief of schools in the provinces of the former Kingdom of Naples: held chair of anthropology and pedagogy at Univ. of Naples. Founded and edited the periodical Progresso educativo. Some of his writings published posthumously, among them L'incivilimento in Turchia and a collection of lectures on anthropology and pedagogy.
      Fusco's H.W. article ["Turks under Arms", IX, 414–17. June 17, 1854] describes a review of Turkish troops in Constantinople, Oct. 1853, at which he was a spectator. 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Enciclopedia "Italiana" 
Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971


 

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Mrs Gascoyne

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Possibly Caroline Leigh Smith Gascoigne.

Articles: 92 · Attachments: 0 · Links: 0 · Hits: 4288

Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn (Stevenson)Mrs Gaskell I 1810–1865, novelist. Attended the Misses Byerley’s school in Stratford-on-Avon. In 1832 married William Gaskell. Her first published writing, verse written in collaboration with her husband, appeared in Blackwood’s, 1837. Thereafter contributed to Howitt’s Journal, Sunday School Penny Magazine, both of Dickens’s periodicals, Cornhill; occasionally to other periodicals. Published in book form Mary Barton, 1848; Ruth, 1853; and Sylvia’s Lovers, 1863; published her other novels first as serials in periodicals; Wives and Daughters was appearing in Cornhill at time of her death. Author also of The Life of Charlotte Brontë, 1857.

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William Gaskell

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Gaskell, William I Mr. Gaskell I 1805–1884, Unitarian minister. M.A. University of Glasgow, 1825 (Graduates of the University of Glasgow); thereafter divinity student at Manchester College, York. From 1828 to his death, minister of Cross Street Chapel, Manchester. Professor of English history and literature at Manchester New College; lecturer at Owens College. For many years one of the editors of Unitarian Herald. Published sermons and controversial tracts, and Two Lectures on the Lancashire Dialect, 1854. Also wrote verse: "Sketches among the Poor," Blackwood's, 1837, written in collaboration with his wife; Temperance Rhymes, 1839; Cottonopolis, 1882. Composed and translated hymns. 

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Gaskell, Margaret Emily I Miss Meta Gaskell I 1837–1913, second daughter of the Rev. William Gaskell and his wife Elizabeth. Elizabeth Gaskell wrote of her daughter to George Smith: "Please always call her Meta – she never was called 'Margaret' from her birth..." (Letters, No. 451). Attended a school conducted by Miss Rachel Martineau in Liverpool. Travelled much with her mother on the Continent. Worked with her mother in relieving distress of the poor in Manchester; taught in Ragged School; once thought of nursing as a career, but did not actively pursue the plan. Was the most talented and intellectual of the Gaskell daughters. Had ability in music and art; received drawing lessons from Ruskin; at one time thought of becoming professional artist. After parents' death, continued to live in Manchester; was active in support of charitable and civic institutions. Her writing confined almost entirely to letter writing. A letter written by her after a visit to Haworth with her mother contains "one of the best extant accounts of life at the parsonage in Mr. Brontë's later years" (Hopkins, Elizabeth GaskellI, p. 310)

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971

 

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John Gaunt

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See entry for William Gaunt

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William Gaunt

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Gaunt, John and William Gaunt I Communicated I sons of John Gaunt, confectioner of North Shields. In 1827, after the disappearance of a doctor's apprentice from North Shields, John Gaunt the elder became suspected of having murdered the apprentice for the purpose of selling the body for dissection. The utterly unfounded suspicion led to ostracism and perseuction of the entire Gaunt family. Their confectionery trade was ruined, and the sons John and William, who had obtained work in a glass manufactory, were obliged to support their parents. Towns-people insulted members of the family and solicited the sons' employers to dismiss them. On discovery of the Burke and Hare murders, the Gaunt house was nightly surrounded by a threatening mob, and the family were in danger of being murdered. Seven years after the disappearance of the apprentice, a meeting in North Shields, May 9, 1834, cleared Gaunt of the supicion by bringing to light the fact that the apprentice had enlisted in the service of the East India Company and had died of cholera in 1832.

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Frances George

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George, Frances (Southwell) I Mrs. Shale St. George, Mrs. St. George I The Office Book records payment for "Where Dwell the Dead?" [I, 596. Sept. 14, 1850] as made by post-office order (i.e., presumably to an address in England, though the contributor cannot have been in England on Sept. 9, 1850, the recorded payment date); for "From a Settler's Wife" as [IV, 585-88. March 13, 1852] "Remitted to New Zealand"; for "An Emigrant's Glance Homeward" [V, 80. April 10, 1852] as "Remitted to Auckland." In "From a Settler's Wife" the contributor states that she was brought up as "an idle English lady," dividing her time between "books and amusements, but giving much more of it to pleasure than to study." With her husband, an attorney, she emigrated to New Zealand. After a voyage "of four months and fourteen days," she writes, "we reached Auckland, our destined home ... on the 18th December."

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Mary W. A. Gibson

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Not identified. Directories do not list a Miss Gibson at the address given. The second initial recorded for Miss Gibson in the Office Book entry for her first contribution cannot be read as other than "H"; it may be intended for "A” or it may be a mis-recording. The contributor is clearly the Miss Gibson to whom Dickens wrote on December 17 1857. Sotheby's 1938 sales catalogue of a portion of Count de Suzannet's library lists Dickens's letter of that date, addressed to Miss Mary W. A. Gibson, and quotes some lines from it; Nonesuch Letters gives the entire letter, with the addressee recorded as "Miss Mary A. W. Gilson". Dickens's letter indicates that Miss Gibson had written to ask for help or advice in getting her writings published. Dickens wrote that no touch of his pen would do for the writings what they could not do for themselves, and then suggested: "If you should desire to offer anything to Household Words, I will promptly read it myself". He proposed, also, two days on which Miss Gibson might call to see him; he would see her, he wrote, with "the greatest readiness". The first contribution that the Office Book assigns to Miss Gibson appeared a little more than two months after Dickens's invitation to her to become a contributor.

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William Sidney Gibson

N/A — 3/1/1871

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Barrister, miscellaneous writer. Privately educated. Admitted at Lincoln's Inn, 1839; called to the bar, 1845. Registrar of Newcastle-upon-Tyne district court of bankruptcy, 1843-1869. Hon. M. A. University of Durham. F.S.A., F.G.S., and member of other learned societies in England and on the Continent. Lectured on antiquarian and other subjects. Contributed to Notes & Queries, Bentley's Miscellany, New Monthly, and other periodicals. Published works on literary and antiquarian matters, e.g., The History of the Monastery Founded at Tynemouth, 1846-1847; Remarks on the Mediaeval Writers of English History, 1848; A Memoir of Northumberland, 1860.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1973.

 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

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Charles Gill

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Not identified. His article discusses the climate of Victoria, Australia; it contains a reference to the bush fire of 1851, "already described in this Journal"—i.e., in Howitt's "Black Thursday", May 10 1856. The "already described in this Journal" is probably an editorial insertion.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971.

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Miss [?] Godfrey

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Not identified. "A Cousin in Need" tells of a young clergyman's being given a ride to Berlin by a man in uniform who turns out to be Frederick William I. A parallel incident is related by Augustus J. C. Hare, The Story of My Life (II, 373-374), the persons in that account being an acquaintance of Hare's and the Crown Prince of Prussia. Payment for the contribution made by cheque.

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German writer, philosopher, artist and politician.

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