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John Rose Cormack

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Physician. MD. University of Edinburgh, 1837. F.R.C.P. Edinburgh, 1841. Physician to Royal Infirmary and to Fever Hospital, Edinburgh, to 1845. Practised in London, 1847-1866. Removed to France. M.D. University of France, 1870. During siege of Paris rendered conspicuous service to British residents and to the wounded of both sides. Made Chevalier of Legion of Honour, 1871; knighted 1872. Established Edinburgh Monthly Journal of Medical Science, 1841; editor to 1846. Established London Journal of Medicine, 1849; editor to 1852. Editor of Association Medical Journal, 1853-1855. Contributed occasionally to non-professional periodicals, e.g., Athenaeum. Published Clinical Studies, 1876, a collection of his principal writings.  

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Dudley Costello

25/5/1803 — 30/9/1865

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Journalist and author. Educated at Royal Military College, Sandhurst; obtained commission, served in army in North America and in West Indies. Retired on half pay, 1828. Thereafter for some time in Paris, copying illuminated MSS in Bibliothèque Royale; later worked with his sister Louisa Stuart Costello on illuminations of some of her books. Was good linguist; became foreign correspondent for Morning Herald, later, foreign editor of Daily News. Connected with Constitutional; from 1845 to his death with Examiner. Contributed to Bentley's Miscellany, Ainsworth's, Chambers's, New Monthly. Author of A Tour through the Valley of the Meuse, 1845; Piedmont and Italy, 1859-1861; three novels. Published two collections of stories and sketches. In 1861 granted Civil List pension of £75 a year "In consideration of the many years devoted by him to the pursuit of literature, and the high character of his works" (Colles, Literature and the Pension List).

 

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Miniature painter, author. Born in Ireland; in 1814 went with her widowed mother to Paris. By her miniature painting supported her brother Dudley Costello while he was at Sandhurst, also later. On her removal to London, continued miniature painting as profession; gained much distinction by her work. In 1835 published Specimens of the Early Poetry of France, with illuminations executed by her and her brother. The work brought her the friendship of Sir WaIter Scott and first made her generally known as a writer; thereafter devoted herself almost entirely to literature. Contributed to Literary Gazette, Athenaeum, Bentley's Miscellany, Ainsworth's, New Monthly, Ladies' Companion, and other periodicals. Edited The Rose Garden of Persia, 1845, translations from Persian poets, with illuminations by her and her brother. Author of The Maid of the Cyprus Isle, 1815, and other volumes of poems; Memoirs of Eminent Englishwomen, 1844; books of travel, and semi-historical novels. Elizabeth Barrett suggested to Horne in 1843 that his New Spirit of the Age should certainly include Miss Costello, "who is a highly accomplished woman, and full of grace and sense of beauty" (Letters ... to Richard Hengist Horne, II, 154-55). In 1852 granted Civil List pension of £75 a year "In consideration of her merits as an authoress, and her inability, from the state of her health, to continue her exertions for a livelihood" (Colles, Literature and the Pension List).

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Miss [?] Cox

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Cox, Miss. Address: Kensington. Not identified. A Miss Cox (no first name) is listed in Kelly's Post Office London Directory, 1850, as living at 3 Bullingham Place, Church St., Kensington.

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George Craig

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Craig, George I George Craig, Telegraph & Courier, Bombay I The Bombay Almanac and Book of Direction, for 1855 lists Craig as manager and sub-editor of the Oriental News. The Bombay Calendar and Almanac for 1858 lists him as editor of the Telegraph and Courier. J. A. Crowe, Reminiscences (p. 267), mentioned the Telegraph as "directed by Mr. Craig, but financed by natives." The H.W. contributor Meason had preceded Craig as editor of the Telegraph. The periodical at times reprinted items from H.W.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971.


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Craik, Georgiana Marion I Miss Craik I, 1831-1895, novelist; daughter of George Lillie Craik (D.N.B.). In 1886 married Allan Walter May, artist. Contributed her first stories to periodicals. Published some twenty-five novels; Lost and Won, 1859, the most popular. Wrote also books for children; one of her "So-Fat and Mew-Mew" stories seemed to George Eliot "a little chef-d'oeuvre" (Letters, IV, 69).

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[?] Cramer

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Cramer. Not identified. The writer's contribution ["The Way I Made My Fortune" IV, 105-107. Oct. 25, 1851] is a somewhat amusing story laid in France and told in first person. It concerns a hoax which the narrator had no part in contriving, but which made him rich. Payment marked "Enclsoed & fetched." Item included in the Putname volume of selections from H.W.: Home and Social Philosophy, 2nd ser. 

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971. 

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Catherine Crowe

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Crowe, Catherine (Stevens) I Mrs. Crowe l, 1800?-1876, novelist, writer on the supernatural. Contributed to Chambers's, Ladies' Companion, Once a Week, and other periodicals. Published plays, children's books, novels, and collections of stories. Best known of the novels were Adventures of Susan Hopley, 1841, and The Story of Lilly Dawson, 1847. Best known of the collections of stories was The Night Side of Nature; or, Ghosts and Ghost Seers, 1848, accounts of supernatural happenings, prophetic dreams, presentiments, etc., gathered from many sources and animated in the retelling by Mrs. Crowe's belief in what she related: the book went through several editions; the title, recorded J. A. Crowe mischievously (Reminiscences, p. 74), Douglas Jerrold once paraphrased "in a way I cannot repeat." In 1859 published Spiritualism, and the Age We Live In. Well known in literary circles of Edinburgh and London; correspondent of Sydney Smith; conjectured to be author of Vestiges of ... Creation during the time that the authorship of the book was a matter of speculation. For an amusing instance of her quasi-acceptance of the authorship, see Lehmann, Ancestors and Friends, p. 125.

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Crowe, Sir Joseph Archer I Mr. Joseph Crowe, J. A. Crowe I,1825-1896, journalist, foreign service official, art historian; second son of Eyre Evans Crowe. Born in London, but passed his boyhood mainly in France. Education directed largely by his father. Like his brother Eyre, wished to become artist; studied for a time under Paul Delaroche, whose atelier he described in the H.W. article "Young France at the Easel" [v, 149-52. May 1, 1852]. For some time kept terms at Inner Temple. Reporter for Morning Chronicle; correspondent and reporter, later foreign subeditor, for Daily News; correspondent for Illus. London News during Crimean War; for the Times during Indian Mutiny and Austro-Italian War. Wrote for Examiner, Athenaeum, Westm. Rev., Edin. Rev. From 1860 on, held appointments in diplomatic service, first as consul-general at Leipzig, then at Düsseldorf; thereafter as commercial attaché for Berlin and Vienna, then for whole of Europe. Author of The Early Flemish Painters, 1856; A New History of Painting in Italy, 1864-68; and other histories of art, which held important place in art criticism. As art historian, was aided in his research by G. B. Cavalcaselle. C.B. 1885; K.C.M.G. 1890.

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Eyre Crowe

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Crowe, Eyre l E. Crowe, Junr. l, 1824-1910, historical and genre painter; eldest son of Eyre Evans Crowe. Born in London, but passed his boyhood mainly in France. Education directed largely by his father. Studied painting under Paul Delaroche; thereafter, at Royal Academy schools. Exhibited at the Academy and at British Institution. Several of his works in public galleries. A.R.A. 1875. Author of With Thackeray In Amenca, 1893; Thackeray's Haunts and Homes, 1897. 

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Eyre Evans Crowe

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Crowe, Eyre Evans I E. E. Crowe I, 1799-1868, journalist, historian. Student at Trinity College, Dublin; left at age sixteen, without degree, to work as journalist in London. Paris correspondent, later leader writer, for Morning Chronicle.Engaged by Dickens as leader writer for Daily News;succeeded Forster as editor, Oct. 1846; made to resign editorship, 1851. Thereafter lived in France. Wrote for Examiner, Athenaeum;occasionally contributed to Quart. Rev., Edin. Rev. Author of several novels, and of The Greek and the Turk,1853; History of the Reigns of Louis XVIII and Charles X, 1854; The History of France, 1858-68 (revised and enlarged from earlier publication in Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopaedia). 

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W. Crowe

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Crowe, W. Not identified. The contributor’s article [“The Game Season at Spürt” X, 262-64. Oct. 28, 1854] describes the activities in a Continental gaming casino. Dickens thought the paper better than Jerrold’s “Paris upon Wheels” (to Wills, Oct. 6, 1854; MS Huntingdon Library). Office Book memorandum reads: “Cheque to Dr. Stonar.”

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971.  

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Peter Cunningham

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Cunningham, Peter I Peter Cunningham, Cunningham, P. Cunningham l, 1816-1869, author and scholar. Educated at Christ's Hospital. Held position in Audit Office, 1834-60. Member of Shakespeare Society. F.S.A. During later years became victim of what Vizetelly called "convivial indulgence" (Glances Back through Seventy Years, I, 259), i.e., chronic alcoholism; one of boon companions of the convivial years was Frederick Dickens. Contributed to Ladies' Companion, Gent. Mag., Builder, Athenaeum, Illus. London News, and other periodicals. His Extracts from the Accounts of the Revels at Court printed for the Shakespeare Society, 1842; later denounced as forgery (see Tannenbaum, Shakspere Forgeries in the Revels Accounts). Wrote life of Inigo Jones and of NelI Gwyn. In 1849 published A Handbook for London (1850 edition: Hand-Book of London). Edited Works of Goldsmith, Johnson's Lives of the poets, Letters of Horace Walpole, and other works.

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Dallas, William Sweetland I Dallas I, 1824-1890, writer on natural history. Born in London. Clerk in commercial house in the City. Largely self taught in natural history. For some ten years, occupied in preparing lists of insects for British Museum. Thereafter curator of museum of Yorkshire Philosophical Society, 1858-68; from 1868, assistant secretary to Geological Society of London. F.L.S., F.G.S. Contributed to Philosophical Magazine, Annals and Magazine of Natural History, Westm. Rev. Edited Popular Science Review, 1877-81. Translated scientific and other works from the German and the Swedish, Author of A Natural History of the Animal Kingdom, 1856 (first published as part of Orr's Circle of the Sciences); Elements of Entomology,1857.

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Rebecca Harding Davis

24/6/1831 — 29/9/1910

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Rebecca Harding Davis (1831-1910) was one of the United States’ premier writers from the 1860s until her death in 1910.  While Davis is accurately recognized as a pioneering realist, she also engaged in an impressive range of other literary styles—including romanticism, folklore, and the gothic—to convey her analyses of American culture.  After gaining national stature with her first major publication, “Life in the Iron-Mills” (Atlantic Monthly, April 1861), Davis went on to publish ten novels and a collection of short stories in book form, an additional sixteen serialized novels, hundreds of short stories and essays for adults, more than a hundred short stories for juveniles, and a memoir.  Davis’s writings addressed major political and social events of the nineteenth century—the relationship of capitalists and laborers, the Civil War, Reconstruction, changing social roles for women, US imperialism, and especially the lives of “everyday men and women.”

Biodata by Sharon M. Harris, University of Connecticut, Storrs, for the Rebecca Harding Davis Society. Accessed 26 July 2013.

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[?] Day

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Day. Not identified. The writer's contribution recounts the life of Henry Stuart, Cardinal York, and tells of a British officer's meeting the Cardinal in Basilicata during the Napoleonic campaigns in Southern Italy. The officer had given the contributor an account of the meeting. Payment for the contribution made by post-office order.

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Mme. [?] De Mérey

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De Mérey, Mme. I Mad. De Meley I, d. 1855, Hungarian refugee. Well-educated woman; wife of wealthy nobleman, a staff officer in Hungarian army. Both husband and wife were friends of Kossuth. Lost their property during Hungarian revolution; fled Hungary in 1849 under assumed name. By Sept. 1850, M. De Mérey was living in Manchester under name "Marton"; his wife arrived shortly thereafter, with their children. In 1851 the family re-assumed the name De Mérey, "which as far as I recollect," wrote Susanna Winkworth, "was their true one." In Manchester, befriended by the Winkworths, the Gaskells, the Salis Schwabes. Were very poor; made living by giving lessons – M. De Mérey in Hungarian and on violin, Mme. De Mérey in French and German. On death of husband in 1.853, Mme. De Mérey set up millinery establishment (Susanna Winkworth, ed., Letters and Memorials of Catherine Winkworth, I, 251-52n, 333n, et passim; Letters of Mrs Gaskell, passim). According to a letter of Stephen Winkworth (Letters and Memorials, I, 259), Mme. de Mérey was the "Caroline Marton" who wrote "Louis Kossuth and His Family," Bentley's Misc., Oct. 1850.

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Augustus De Morgan

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De Morgan, Augustus I De Morgan I, 1806-1871, mathematician. B.A. Cambridge, 1827. F.R.A.S. For more than thirty years professor of mathematics at University College, London. The list of his books and of his contributions to professional journals, to the Penny Cyclopaedia, and to other encyclopaedic works covers fifteen pages in Mrs. De Morgan's Memoir of her husband; in addition, made "voluminous contributions" to Athenaeum and N. & Q. In 1870 granted Civil List pension of £100 a year "In consideration of his distinguished merits as a mathematician" (Colles, Literature and the Pension List).

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De Morgan, Sophia Elizabeth (Frend), 1809-1892, misc. writer; daughter of William Frend (D.N.B.); wife of Augustus De Morgan. Educated largely under superintendence of her father, who taught her Hebrew at an early age and encouraged her reading of philosophical and metaphysical works. Took active interest in social betterment and reform movements, as in education for women, improvement of conditions in workhouses, playgrounds for "gutter children," anti-vivisection crusade. Became a spiritualist. Contributed occasional articles to periodicals. Wrote stories for children, a memoir of her husband, an autobiography, and a book on spirit manifestation – From Matter to Spirit, 1863.

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Delepierre, Joseph Octave I Delepierre I, 1802-1879, antiquary, author. Born in Bruges. LL.D. Univ. Of Ghent. Practised as advocate in Brussels; then for some twenty years was archivist in Bruges. In 1849 appointed Belgian secretary of legation in London; held position for many years; also consul-general for Belgium in London. Popular among English men and women of literary, artistic, and social distinction, many of whom were to be seen at his Sunday evening receptions. Members of Philobiblon and other learned societies, to whose publications he contributed. F.S.A. Contributed to St. James's Magazine. Author of more than fifty works, most of them in French, some in English, e.g., Old Flanders, 1845; A Sketch of the History of Flemish Literature, 1860.

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