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Mr. [?] Brooks

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Brooks, Mr. The Office Book records "[Chip:] A Lynch Trial in California" [III, 611-12. Sept. 20, 1851], as arriving at the editorial office "per C. Buxton Esq." Payment is recorded as "Enclosed & sent." Editorial comment prefaced to the item states that the writer is "a University Graduate who was an eyewitness" to the lynch trial, and that his communication is dated from Grass Valley, Nevada County, May 23,1851. The "communication" may be an authentic one; or, like another "Brooks" publication, it may be a hoax. 

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Brough, Robert Barnabas I Brough, RBrough, B. Brough l, 1828-1860, writer. Attended a school in Newport, Monmouthshire. Had ability in drawing, but received no training in art. Worked as clerk in Manchester. In 1847, in Liverpool, started a satirical weekly, the Liverpool Lion. After removal to London, became contributor to the comic press: Man in the Moon, Diogenes, Comic Times; then to Illus. Times, the Train. For a time Brussels correspondent of Sunday Times; editor for short time of Atlas and of Welcome Guest. Author of Songs of the "Governing Classes," 1855; The Life of Sir John Falstaff, 1857-58; Which Is Which? or, Miles Cassidy's Contract, 1860; and other writings. Published, 1856, translation of Beranger's songs. Wrote many successful pieces for the stage, some of them alone, some in collaboration with his brother WilIiam [also a Household Words contributor]. 

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William Brough

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Brough, William I W. Brough, Brough l, 1826-1870, writer. Like his brother Robert [also a Household Words contributor], attended a school in Newport, Monmouthshire. For a time apprenticed to a printer. His first literary effort, a series of papers titled "Hints upon Heraldry," appeared in his brother's Liverpool Lion. Later, wrote for London periodicals. Alone and in collaboration with his brother, also in collaboration with Andrew Halliday, composed extravaganzas, farces, and other stage entertainments. His Field of the Cloth of Gold, first produced at Strand Theatre, 1868, played 298 times. Was member of Dramatic Authors' Society. 

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Dr. [?] Brown

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Brown, Dr. Not identified. The contributor calls his article ["Falling Leaves" XVI, 354-55. Oct. 10, 1857] a "gossip about leaves." It is a botanical discussion for laymen. 

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971. 

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H. J. Brown

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Brown, H. J. Not identified. "Navvies As They Used to Be" [XIII, 543-50. June 21, 1856] gives the following information about the contributor: Was born in a remote corner of Hertfordshire; attended school for six years in an academy near Harrow, completing his studies there in 1834, at age sixteen. Watching the construction of the London and Birmingham Railway line near Harrow, became interested in engineering; with the aid of Grier's Mechanic's Calculator and "Jones on Levelling," taught himself the rudiments of what he resolved was to be his profession. Despite his guardian's opposition, set out in March 1835 for the nearest railway works, determined to follow in the wake of the Smeatons, Stephensons, and Brunels. Worked with tunnel and embankment construction gangs in Hertfordshire, beginning as tip-boy and bucket-steerer, becoming assistant to subcontractor, then being placed in charge of certain work himself. In his article, describes the navvies of the mid-1830s at work and in their shanty lodgings, and pictures fights that made their name "a bye-word and a terror."

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971. 

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Miss [?] Browne

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Browne, Miss. Not identified. Perhaps the Miss Browne to whom payment was handed for the item assigned to [Mr.] Browne of Boulogne. Payment to Miss Browne for her contribution made by post-office order. 

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1971. 

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Mr. [?] Browne

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Browne, Mr. Address: Rue de Ville [? word unclear], Boulogne. Not identified. The writer is an Englishman. His article ["The 'Irish Difficulty' Solved by Con McNale" I, 207-210. May 25, 1850] recounts the life of an Irish peasant who, by hard work and perseverance, has risen from "a herd-boy to a country jontleman." The account is given in the Irishman's own words, as told by him to the writer. Instead of the Government's attempt to solve the "Irish Difficulty" by "illigant schames" that look fine on paper but are unworkable in reality, says the Irishman, "Why not tache the boys to do as I have done?" Like the Browne (or Brown) of Paris, the writer has an interest in farming. He may be the same person. 

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Browne or Brown [1]. Address: Paris. Not identified. The Office Book records payment for the first item ["Two French Farmers" XI, 105-108. March 3, 1855] as made to Browne by "Cheque to Paris"; for the second ["Much Ado about Nothing" XII, 422-427. Dec. 1, 1855], it gives the writer as "Brown (of Paris)" and records payment as made in cash. In his first contribution, which seems to be factual. the writer tells of living for a time on a farm in the outskirts of Paris, "for the sake of experience"; he takes "a lively interest in ... agricultural affairs." The interest in farming suggests that he may be Browne of the Boulogne address. 

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Browne or Brown [2]. Not identified. The items ["Plagues of London" I Browne I XI, 316-19. May 5, 1855; "Wigs" I Brown I XI, 619-20. July 28, 1855; "Weird Wisdom" I Brown I XII,141-44. Sept. 8, 1855; "The Light of Other Days" I Brown I XII 201-203. Sept. 29,1855; "Barbarous Torture" I Browne I XII, 247-49. Oct. 13, 1855; "Scrooby" I Brown I XII, 499-502. Dec. 22, 1855; "Early Days in Dulminster" I Browne I XIII, 116-20. Feb. 16, 1856; "Perfectly Contented" I Brown & Morley I XIV, 213-16. Sept. 13, 1856] (with Office Book ascription recorded for each) are of mild historical and antiquarian interest, so similar in content and attitude as to indicate that they are clearly the writing of one contributor. They are based on books, periodicals, documents, and old letters, as well as on the writer's own recollection of conditions of some thirty years ago. The writer's attitude, in general, is that the present is preferable to "the good old times." 

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British poet, novelist and dramatist, son of Robert Buchanan (1813—1866), journalist. Notable works include the novel The Shadow of the Sword (1876), plays such as Lady Clare (1883), Sophia (1886), A Man's Shadow (1890) and The Charlatan (1894) and poems such as 'The Drama of Kings' (1871), 'St Abe and his Seven Wives (1872) and 'Balder the Beautiful' (1877), 'The City of Dream' (1888), 'The Outcast: A Rhyme for the Time' (1891) and 'The Wandering Jew' (1893). Also contributed extensively to periodicals.

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

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Buckland, Francis Trevelyan I Buckland, Frank Buckland l, 1826-1880, naturalist. B.A. Oxford, 1848; M.A. 1851. Studied medicine at St. George's Hospital. M.R.CS. 1851. Assistant-surgeon, 2nd Life Guards, 1854-63. In 1867 appointed inspector of fisheries; thereafter devoted himself largely to pisciculture. Contributed to Bentley's Misc., Leisure Hour, Daily News, Times, and other periodicals. On staff of the Field. With some friends, founded Land and Water, 1866; wrote much for the periodical. Author of Curiosities of Natural History, 1857-66; Log-Book of a Fisherman, 1875; Natural History of British Fishes and Notes and Jottings from Animal Life, both published posthumously. 

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Buckley, Theodore Alois William (name thus in Alumni Oxon.; Theodore William Alois Buckley in D.N.B.) I Buckley l,1825-1856, classical scholar, misc. writer, F.S.A. Self-taught from age twelve. Early began reading in British Museum; collected material for edition of Apuleius's De deo Socratis. Became protege of the Greek scholar George Burges, who brought him to attention of patrons of ancient literature. As a result, cost of publishing De deo Socratis, 1844, was defrayed by the Rt. Hon. Thomas Grenville, and Buckley received servitorship to Christ Church, Oxford. Was brilliant Latin student; also had musical ability. B.A. 1849; M.A. 1853. Became one of chaplains of Christ Church. Had recourse to opium (a habit formed in early life) and subsequently to alcohol, supposedly because of disease. Removed to London. Supported himself by writing for periodicals – Eliza Cook's Journal, Sharpe's, the Press, and others; and by working for the booksellers. Translated and edited numerous Greek and Roman classics for Bohn and other publishers; edited Canterbury Tales, Milton's Poetical Works, and other English classics; also various historical and ecclesiastical works. Translated Guizot's Life of Washington. Author of The Great Cities of the Ancient World and other serious works; also of such popular writings as The Boy's First Help to Reading, The Diverting ... Adventures of Mr. Sydenham Greenfinch

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Poet and Viceroy of India. Son of Edward George Bulwer Lytton.

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

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Bulwer-Lytton, Edward George Earle Lytton, first Baron Lytton I Sir Bulwer Lytton l, 1803-1873, author, M.P. B.A. Cambridge, 1826; M.A. 1835; Hon. LL.D. Oxford, also Cambridge. Created baronet 1838; in 1843, on succeeding to Knebworth estate, added Lytton to his surname; raised to peerage 1866. M.P. for many years at various periods of his life. As editor and as contributor, connected with numerous periodicals, e.g., New Monthly, Monthly Chronicle, Edin. Rev., Blackwood's, Quart. Rev. Author of more than twenty-five works of fiction; dramatist; author of poems and miscellaneous works. 

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Mr [?] Byng

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Not identified. 'The Sailor at Home' gives information on Sailors' Homes established in the U.S.; lists also Homes in the British Isles not mentioned in the H.W. article 'The Sailors' Home', March 22 1851. The contributor obviously sent the material to H.W. to supplement the information given in 'The Sailors' Home'.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1973.

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Poet and scholar. B.A. Cambridge, 1843; M.A. 1846. Took holy orders, though with hesitation; curate,1846-1856  (J. A. Venn, Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List, 1940-1954); then withdrew from Church on conscientious grounds as result of his speculations and his study of Comte. Thereafter devoted himself to literature and philosophy; took much interest in social and political reform. Friend of George Eliot and G. H. Lewes. One of the original editors of Cambridge Magazine. Contributed to Leader, Westminster Review, Cornhill Magazine, Theological Review, Fortnightly Review. At least one of his poems appeared in A.Y.R. Author of Lyra Hellenica, 1842, translations from the Greek; Reverberations and Golden Histories, poems; Final Causes, a volume of essays, published posthumously.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1973.

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Military officer, miscellaneous writer. Entered service of East India Co. as cadet, 1817; lieut., 1816; captain, 1826; served in Burmese War, 1826-1827; invalided, 1831; subsequently promoted to a majority. Contributed to annuals and to numerous periodicals. "We take it for granted that everybody knows something of Major Campbell", wrote a reviewer in 1851, since everybody "reads some magazine or another", and Major Campbell "writes in all the magazines" (People's & Howitt's Journal, IV, 244). Author of Lays from the East, 1831; Winter Nights, 1850; Episodes in the War-Life of a Soldier, 1857; and other volumes of poems, sketches, and stories. Generally praised by reviewers for the melody of his verse and the interest of his prose pieces. W. M. Rossetti ("Memoir" of D. G. Rossetti, in Dante Gabriel Rossetti: His Family-Letters, I, 110) called him "a lively writer in a minor way".

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1973.

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

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[?] Cape

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The contributor may be George A. Cape, Jr., secretary to the Lambeth Baths and Wash Houses Co.; author of Baths and Wash Houses, 1854; co-author, with W. G. Harrison, of The Joint Stock Companies Act, 1856. Cape's pamphlet on baths and wash houses describes the Lambeth establishment and gives suggestions for the erection and management of such establishments. It preaches the virtue of "simple soap and water" in "improving the health and morals of the lowly and indigent" and in combatting disease. It describes the crowded, filthy hovels of the poor as the breeding place of fever and plague, and warns that "the pestilence ... that is bred in a hut, may spread to the palace". The preface to Cape's pamphlet is dated December 1 1853. The poem assigned to Cape in the Office Book appeared in H.W. on December 10. It seems likely that Cape's earnest preaching of sanitary reform overflowed into rhyme.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1973

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John Capper

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Journalist. F.R.A.S. Resident in Ceylon as early as 1836, sometime manager of coffee plantation. Connected for almost forty years with the press in Ceylon and India. On title page of one of his books, 1852, designated himself "Late Editor of the 'Emigrants' Journal'" (periodical title given on title page of later book as "Emigrant's Journal"); on title page of another book, 1853, designated himself "Late Editor of the Ceylon Examiner". For many years associated with J. O. B. Saunders, proprietor of Calcutta Englishman; in the 1870s edited Ceylon Times. Also correspondent for London Times and representative for that paper of Mincing Lane interests. Occasional contributor to Chambers's. Died in London, where, up to the time of his death, was active member of Ceylon Association. Author of books on Australia: The Emigrants' Guide to Australia, 1852, and Australia: As a Field for Capital, Skill, and Labour, 1854. Recorded himself on title pages of two of his books as author of Our Gold Colonies; on title page of another, as author of The Gold Fields; the two titles not listed in bibliographies of his writings or in Britsh Museum General Catalogue of Books. Also author of books on India and Ceylon: The Three Presidencies of India, 1853; The Duke of Edinburgh in Ceylon. A Book of Elephant and Elk Sport, 1871; A Full Account of the Buddhist Controversy, Held at Pantura, 1873; and two collections of stories and sketches of Ceylon.


Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1973.

 

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John Bate Cardale

7/11/1802 — 18/7/1877

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Solicitor; member of Irvingite (Catholic Apostolic) Church. Educated at Rugby. Articled to his father, a solicitor; head, 1824-1834, of London firm of Cardale, Iliffe, and RusselI. From 1832 to his death was Irvingite apostle; also named prophet. Served as legal adviser to Irving; ordained Irving. Was frequently at Albury, Surrey, the centre of Irvingite activity and site of Irvingite church; in July 1835, retired to Albury with other apostles and prophets to spend two and a half years in consultation. Died at Albury. Author of works on doctrinal matters; various of his sermons and discourses privately printed. In the 1850s, Cardale was Dickens's neighbour in Tavistock Square, Dickens wrote him occasional notes on neighbourhood and business matters. The motivation for Cardale's H.W. contribution was the discussion of locusts in 'The Roving Englishman', December 30 1854. Cardale's brief item records his attempt to preserve by application of chemicals "an insect of the locust tribe" which "about twelve years ago ... flew or was blown into the windows of a house on Albury Heath". The Office Book records no payment for the item.

Author: Anne Lohrli; © University of Toronto Press, 1973.

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 

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