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away with unresting regularity, (Coleridge
called a steam-engine " a giant with one
idea"—what a capital expression!) and keeps
a dozen necessary machines spinning; a
circular saw hisses through the wood like
fire; or steel is carved into the tools of labour.

And it is worth while pausing here to
notice the comparatively insignificant period
of time in which these Docks have reached
such substantial magnificence. London was
about a century behind Liverpool in the
matter of wet docks. The West India Docks
(which were the first) did not open, even
partially, till 1802; the East India followed
next (the two companies joined in 1838); and
the London Docks were opened in 1805. They
had a monopoly of ships coming with wine,
brandy, tobacco, and rice (except from the
East and West Indies); but this expired in
1826.

It may be merely fanciful on my part
possibly, perhaps, only a liveliness induced
by approaching emigration,—but I think
these Docks must positively be places of
luxurious wandering to Custom House officers.
You don't go far there without lighting on
one of these gentlemen. What must his
feelings be when he gazes on the Tobacco
Warehouse; five acres of solid tobacco rising
upwards to the stars! I could write a poem
on that subject, if I did not remember the
fate of my volume. I have often thought of
it as I gazed on the snug little wooden boxes
marked " landing-waiter." I have seen a
gauger buzzing round a cask like a bee
round a flower. There is a little publication
not, perhaps, amusing, but full of matter
a calm, judicious, well-weighed work, called
"The Custom House Guide." This work
sets forth, in cold blood, all that is required for
an aspiring youth employed in the Customs
business to know. For instance, the Phantom
Ship will " clear outwards " before long.
She has previously been what is delicately
called "rummaged," when she delivered her
last cargo. Then the master delivered his
certificate of clearance of last voyage, and
made his "entry outwards," by giving his
"particulars of entry "—names of places
where she is bound, list of goods to be
shipped, &c. No goods can be shipped at all,
before the entry outwards of the ship and
entry of the goods have been made, and there
has been a " cocket " granted; which word
"cocket," according to Johnson, is of
"uncertain derivation," but which means " a seal
belonging to the Custom House," or " a scroll
of parchment sealed and delivered by the
officers of the Custom House to merchants, as
a warrant that their merchandise is entered."
By-the-bye, I have heard it complained that
the cocket writers are given to scrawling
fearfully; and there is an anecdote current,
that one of them, when asked to expound,
replied that he was a " cocket writer," but
by no means a "cocket reader;"—which
cheerful flash of humour must have quite
relieved the dry nature of the business. One
master will have to deliver a " content " of all
goods, packages, marks and numbers on them,
on oath, and answer all questions put to him
by the collector or controller, on oath. The
"file of cockets," and the " victualling bill,"
will, after passing through the hands of the
"searcher," be finally given to him, as his
authority to go. These proceedings make up
what is called a " clearing outwards."

Our captain is now employed in getting his
crew. He has his option as to where he will
engage them; but he must go before a
"Shipping Master," to sign his agreement
with them in his presence. Wages varythe
best amount to about two pounds ten shillings
a month, for an able seaman. The continental
seamen are not paid so well as ours, and are
contented with inferior fareto the profound
contempt of Jack. One day that I was
standing on the quay of the Western Dock,
looking at a Spaniard in a brig, who, somehow
or other, reminded me of Sancho Panza, a
sailor who was standing by, got up a little
conversation. " They gets very little; dessay
them in the brig don't get more than ten
shillings a month. But they can live on anything,
these fellows; sorts of fish, and messes,
that an Englishman would not look at! " To
Jack, that Spaniard exactly realised Junius's
description of somebody as "infamous and
contented."

Meanwhile, the faithful "lumpers" have
stowed the cargo. Cask after cask has swung
with a slow, burly movement over the side,
under the eye of that little brown fellow with
earrings, our first mate. The copper ridge
has gradually sunk lower. Then there is an
appearance of spruce comfort attempted in
the cabina desperate effort made to get the
whole region to look like an easy, comfortable
house. I observe that when Major and Mrs.
Bunt come on board to inspect their abode,
the ropes, masts, wheel, &c., are all as
neat and quiet-looking as if they were only
mere forms or ornamentsas if there would
be no working, tossing, creaking, thumping at
all. But before long, those bare, clear-looking
masts will be alive, like trees clothing themselves
with foliage: I shall be perched on the
poop, watching the land melt into the clouds,
and the morning journals will announce in a
calm unimpassioned manner

"SailedPhantom Ship for Australia.
Fresh breezes, and fine."

THE STORY OF A SAILOR'S LIFE.

CHAPTER THE FOURTH.

My prayer all alone on the solitary island
made me feel a good deal easier; and I had
strength to bury my comrade. I then made
my bed, and laid myself down, with my
dog alongside of me, and soon fell asleep,
and I slept very soundly till the next
morning.

After I awoke I went to the beach to see if

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