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recommended by the travels he had undertaken in
many distant countries, in pursuit of his
favourite study of natural history, and
particularly of botany. He was employed by
his royal patron in laying out the palace
gardens at Lambeth and elsewhere. After
his deathor, it may be, during his travels
the younger Tradescant appears to have held
the office of royal gardener, as I have in my
possession a warrant 'to paye unto Mr.
John Tradescant the sume of fortie pounds,
to be issued upon accompte for worke to be
don for amending the walks in the Vineyard
Garden and for worke to be don in the
gardens at Oatlands, and for repairing the
bowling green there in.' The signatures of
Pembroke, Salisbury, W. Saynsell, and
others, are appended to this original document,
which is addressed 'To our verie loving
friend, Thomas Fauconbridge, Esq., Receiver-
general, &c.;' and at the back is the receipt
of John Tradescant, with his autograph, and
the date, 'vicesimo primo die April, 1648.'

"These few facts might prove interesting,
and might meet the eye of some who may
have it in their power to communicate more
at large concerning two individuals who, in
their day, laboured assiduously to advance
those pursuits which have since become the
delight of so many, and have served to
enlarge the knowledge and increase the
happiness of mankind."

TRAINING FOR THE TROPICS.

IT has been hot, for some time past, in
London; it has been hotter still, elsewhere,
in places about which we often read in the
newspapers, and which interest us greatly as
their fortunes rise and fall in the barometer
of calm or tempest, insurrection or obedience,
peace or war, plenty or famine. The present
summer serves to insinuate a suspicion
which we are not accustomed to entertain at
home, that heat may have some connection
with political power, and that temperature
may modify the conduct of a colony, both
before and after its settlement or its conquest.

Supposing that this sunny season were only
the precursor of an equinoctial summer,
that September and October next, instead
of breezy days and dewy nights, were to
come laden with stifling siroccos and parching
droughts,—what would be the best
method of preparing ourselves to resist and
endure them? How should we act, under
such circumstances, if upon our healthy
action depended the salvation of our lives,
the protection of our homes and our territory,
or even only the proper harvesting of
the daily necessaries of our subsistence and
our trade? But, it comes to pretty much
the same, whether certain special
circumstances come down upon a man, or whether
a man goes to meet and rush into the certain
special circumstanceshe must accommodate
himself to their requirements in either case.
If an Indian atmosphere is not likely to
descend and cover the United Kingdom with
its burning breath, at least a portion of the
life of the United Kingdom is certain to
have to encounter an Indian climate; and
no one will hesitate to allow that there may
be two ways of passing the ordeal: one foolish
and disastrous, the other prudent and
comparatively safe.

When all went smoothly in India, public
attention was rarely turned to the way in
which our neighbours were subjugating a
semi-barbarous and fanatic people, of non-
Christian creed, with strong defences in the
nature of their climate, and in an illimitable
desert into which to retreat and wage a
Parthian war. If these things were mentioned
at all, it was almost always for the purpose
of criticism and blame. This is not the
occasion to speculate on what would have
been the condition of the Mediterranean
and the south of Europe during the last few
years, if the Deys and Emperors of Tunis,
Algiers, and Morocco, had been allowed to
have their own way unchecked; but now
that our Indian troubles have shown us that
we, too, have treacherous and bloodthirsty
pagans to deal with, it is impossible not to
be struck with the parallelism of much that
has occurred, and is occurring in Algeria
and in India. The Algerian conquest is,
in many respects, an abridged epitome and
illustration of the Indian one (with no grand
insurrection as yet); the area and the scale
of conquest are both much smaller; the
amount of population to be managed greatly
inferior; the lapse of time from the outset
of the enterprise is considerably shorter.
The points of resemblance and analogy,
however, are frequent and prominent. For one
party, therefore, to note how the other has
conducted his affairs, is merely the prudence
of an observing man who takes a hint from
the success of others, and receives a warning
from their failure.

Of the many works published on Algeria
by returned officers, one of the most interesting,
because the most applicable to our own
affairs, is that intitled Souvenirs d'un Chef
de Bureau Arabe, by Ferdinand Hugonnet;
whose very start in colonial life reminds us
of the debut of our own cadets. He was a
plain lieutenant when he was called to the
office of Chef de Bureau on one of the
frontiers of Algeria, in a circle inhabited by
restless mountain tribes, who were constantly
at strife with their neighbours. He immediately
set to work to master the people he
had to govern, not only by force, but also
by justice, by kindness, energy, and
disinterested conduct. He resolved to employ his
whole time and talents to make himself the
universal centre in which all passions and all
strength should converge, to receive his sole
direction. To attain that object he had to

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